Final form in a set which takes you from the cradle to the grave

The third, and final, certificate that applies to all people in the UK is the one issued after their death. The area above the main part of the certificate indicates the year of death, the registration district in which the death occurred, the sub-district and the county, in this case Norfolk. The main body ofContinue reading “Final form in a set which takes you from the cradle to the grave”

Getting hitched provides plenty of clues for a family historian

As I said earlier there are three main legal certificates which you will find useful when it comes to researching your family: birth certificate; marriage certificate; and death certificate. In my time as a young reporter we used to refer to births, marriages and deaths as: hatch, match, and despatch. We have covered the birthContinue reading “Getting hitched provides plenty of clues for a family historian”

The long and the short of it means baby gets the first certificate

One of the first certificates you are likely to use in the early days of your family history research is likely to be a birth certificate. You do, however, have to make sure you get the right one because there are two types, the long and the short. The short version is only used asContinue reading “The long and the short of it means baby gets the first certificate”

Six small steps to take you on the journey of a lifetime – or further

WHO AM I? A question many of us will have asked in our lifetime and we will have given ourselves many answers: son, father, socialist; mother, aunt, republican; daughter, teacher, royalist; grandfather, preacher, poet. There may be other roles we do not recognise ourselves playing. On the other hand we may know more about ourContinue reading “Six small steps to take you on the journey of a lifetime – or further”